Ze Barn and realization

When I was a kid, there was this huge maple tree in our oversized backyard. Dad had a shed built to hold all the yard tools, the lawmower and old birdcages from our feathery family members that passed away. He called this shed “Ze Barn”. It was a mini-replica of those oversized hay barns one would see when you drove further out into the country.

Every few years, we’d paint ze barn, waterproof ze barn, sweep ze barn. When I got older, I stole leftover carpet samples from the home decor store nearby and carpeted ze barn. I moved the yard tools into the garage and created a lightly padded bed on the wood that served as a large shelf in ze barn. I hung up pictures from calenders with large nails found in the toolbox. I hung up the bird cages and pretended this barn was a sun room. In the fall, me and my best friend would spend hours there, pretending it was our studio. We’d nap in the cool fall weather and vacuum our carpet samples with tender, loving care.

Dad attached a large, slanted, two room, wooden rabbit cage to the side of ze barn. Housing two rabbits we imported in from a friends farm in Kentucky. I would spend the following year gazing sweetly at the rabbit couple, getting scratched by the rabbits, attacked, bitten, chased and chase by the rabbits. I would learn that no matter how much hay you place in their boxes, the bunnies will still freeze like blocks of rabbit ice in the below zero winter. and that one day you can have two and the next month 20 and ten years later, you will see wild rabbits running through your neighborhood and know that they are the descendants of the couple from Kentucky, who have won their freedom and escaped your grasp that one fall day and now have become pests in South Country Estates.

I climbed the large, maple tree one Sat morn and nailed a 2×4 in between two branches and would sit on it, with my back against the trunk, reading the lates R.L Stine or Christopher Pike book. Spooking myself into nightmares the following evening. One day, that 2×4 broke and I fell, feet first, through the branches and landed, scratched up and terribly spooked- on the rabbit cage.

The weather in Tel Aviv reminds me of those fall to winter days at home. Then I remember- I’m in Israel. I also remember my Hebrew is still terrible and remind myself that I probably am better at Yiddish than actual Hebrew and wonder if -because I can understand a lot of Yiddish- if I should mention it on my resume.

This week i’ve realized some things. I realized that the review of the Torah each year will have a different meaning to me, each year and there are several ways to understand one’s view. I realized that it does give me slight heartache when my co-workers don’t change the water in their goldfish bowl. I realized I have hormones and that’s the most challenging part of being single because those multiple releases are gone, I realized I have no love or compassion for the stalker that has been harassing me and I might, in turn, begin make him feel uncomfortable with clever antics. I realized you can’t live on soup alone for dinner.

I also realized that I think the nicest thing right now that could happen would be to come home from a long day of work and studying and have a nice meal waiting for me, with my laundry done and put away. and a back rub- ahh yes, that would be divine.

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Germapino with a Jewish Twist. Twist. Collective Thoughts of a Ginrod are the musings of a Texas born,half German, half Filipina girl who who went on a trip to Bangkok and found herself in the Holy Land , as a jew, married to an Englishman, with 3 kids and a pup named Henck.

One Response to “Ze Barn and realization”

  1. channahboo October 23, 2006 at 13:00 #

    So is that why you gave me the spare key? Not very subtle hint ginrod 😉

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